Do You Know The Difference Between Fighting and Self Defense?

[caption id="attachment_3493" align="alignleft" width="200"]children karate self-defense Does your child know when to use their self-defense skills?[/caption]

Martial Arts And The Fundamentals Of Self-Defense

Studies show that a struggling economy yields a higher incident rate of violent crime and general lawlessness. That means you may be more likely to find yourself in a potentially dangerous or violent circumstance. A lot of martial arts students believe their training will give them an edge during such confrontations. In truth, it does. But not in the way many students believe.

The Mental Game Of Self-Defense

Suppose an attacker is coming toward you. Your instinct is to protect yourself. If you have studied karate or similar styles, you might be tempted to respond physically. Doing so can result in injury or worse, in the event that you overreact and cause excessive harm to your attacker. This is the reason it is critical that you are mentally prepared to respond appropriately to a confrontation. Mindset plays a key role in safety during a potentially dangerous situation. Too often your emotions can get in the way. This can cause the manner in which you process your circumstances to represent the largest potential threat to your safety.

Understanding The Danger Of Emotions

Anger and fear do more to escalate a confrontation than any other response. Emotions are the antithesis of logic. It's worth noting that few crimes of aggression (i.e. robbery, vandalism, etc.) are done with the goal of fighting. When someone robs you, they seldom want to fight. Martial arts students, prompted by fear or pride, will often react physically to an aggressive crime, which escalates the threat. It prompts a violent response from the robber or would-be attacker.

The Difference Between Fighting And Self-Defense

People fight for many reasons, though most of them can be categorized according to two primary triggers: to attain something or protect something. This can extend to private property, self-esteem, pride, or a sense of honor. These things have nothing to do with protecting yourself from physical harm. Self-defense represents any action you take in order to protect your person. Many martial arts schools unwittingly encourage their students to use the style they are learning to "protect themselves" from criminals. There is a fine line between defending yourself from physical harm and fighting.

A Constructive Response To A Threat Of Violence

Shed your fear and anger. A threat of violence does not actually represent violence. Reacting to the threat because you are fearful or angry can lead to injury. Don't challenge the attacker unless it is likely that you are going to be harmed. If they are demanding your wallet, give it to them. If they want your car, provide the keys. Regardless of how accomplished you are in martial arts, it is a rare situation that justifies using your martial arts as self-defense. Lastly, provide your attacker with an exit strategy. If they feel cornered with no way out, they will react violently. There is a time and place for using martial arts as a tool for self-defense. However, the key to remaining safe in potentially violent circumstances is to recognize that such occasions are rare. The Dojo of Karate is a traditional martial arts school that focus on character development for your kids. They are trained to only use their new learned skill of Karate as a form of self-defense ONLY. Students learn how to avoid conflicts, when to make proper decisions, what to do during a confrontation, etc. To enroll your child in our Introductory Karate Program, call us today at: 303.920.4500 or fill out the form on the top right of this website.




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